Adjectives that Look Like Verbs

Most adjectives are easy to find in a sentence.

I am happy.
He is tall.
They are kind.
Sally is friendly.
I am a happy person.
He is a tall man.
They are kind people.
Sally is a friendly girl.

Some adjectives look like verbs because they have -ed or -ing endings.

I am happy.
He is tall.
They are kind.
Sally is friendly.
I am a happy person.
He is a tall man.
They are kind people.
Sally is a friendly girl.
Some adjectives are used in phrases which include prepositions.
(be + adjective + preposition)
Some require prepositions and objects; some do not.
With preposition and object
I am ready for the show.
They are absent from class.
She is fond of chocolates.
Jim is good at football.
I am familiar with that movie.
Without preposition and object
I am ready.
(Okay)
They are absent.
(Okay)
X (An object is needed here.)
X (An object is needed here.)
X (An object is needed here.)

BE CAREFUL with adjectives that look like verbs in sentences.
They often follow the same pattern (be + adjective + preposition) and can be confusing.

She is interested in biology.
They were surprised at the results.
I am finished with my homework.
We are not prepared for the test.
Mom was tired of driving.
Mr. Moon is worried about his son.
She is interested.
They were surprised.
I am finished.
We are not prepared.
Mom was tired.
Mr. Moon is worried.

The following are verbs, not adjectives, and cannot be used with "be" in the simple past tense.

(Incorrect)
(Incorrect)
(Incorrect)
(Incorrect)
(Incorrect)
He was arrived on time.
It was happened last night.
My dog was died yesterday.
I am slept on the sofa last night.
Mary was decided to go.
He arrived on time.
It happened last night.
My dog died yesterday.
I slept on the sofa last night.
Mary decided to go.
(Correct)
(Correct)
(Correct)
(Correct)
(Correct)
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